ABOUT OUR HISTORY

Roadside America exhibits over 200 years of American history throughout its 7,450 square foot miniature landscape. However, the world's greatest miniature village also has a rich history itself.


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The Beginning

Laurence Gieringer founded Roadside America. The story goes that young Gieringer’s love of miniature models began around 1899, when he was five years old. From his bedroom window, the young Gieringer could see the lights of the Highland Hotel at the crest of nearby Neversink Mountain. From his distant vantage point the building looked like a toy he could snatch from the mountain and add to his toy collection. One day he set out to get that seemingly miniature building, not realizing how far away it really was. Soon he was hopelessly lost in the woods and was not found until the next morning.

Fortunately that experience did not dampen his love for miniatures. In his adult life Mr. Gieringer became a carpenter and painter. Over his sixty-year career Gieringer amassed quite a collection of tiny, detailed buildings and accessories that became one of the worlds most famous and amazing miniature villages. Mr. Gieringer today is one of the world’s most respected builders of miniature models. In the 1930’s word of Mr. Gieringer’s amazing model railroad and miniature villages spread through the local neighborhoods. By 1935, the local newspaper learned of this local marvel and did a feature story about the amazing creation in Mr. Gieringer’s home.

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Roadside_America_front

By 1941 it was time to move again in order to accommodate the increasing interest. Mr. Gieringer purchased land in the village of Shartlesville, PA in late 1940 and began to build a warehouse size building for his new and expanded miniature villages and train displays. In 1953, the new Roadside America opened again at its current site along what was then US Route 22 and today is Interstate 78 in Shartlesville, PA. The current display is beautifully maintained; exactly the way Mr. Gieringer left it when he passed away in 1963. It is operated today by his grand-daughter and her family.

 

ABOUT OUR HISTORY

Roadside America exhibits over 200 years of American history throughout its 7,450 square foot miniature landscape. However, the world's greatest miniature village also has a rich history itself.


never5

The Beginning

Laurence Gieringer founded Roadside America. The story goes that young Gieringer’s love of miniature models began around 1899, when he was five years old. From his bedroom window, the young Gieringer could see the lights of the Highland Hotel at the crest of nearby Neversink Mountain. From his distant vantage point the building looked like a toy he could snatch from the mountain and add to his toy collection. One day he set out to get that seemingly miniature building, not realizing how far away it really was. Soon he was hopelessly lost in the woods and was not found until the next morning.

road

Fortunately that experience did not dampen his love for miniatures. In his adult life Mr. Gieringer became a carpenter and painter. Over his sixty-year career Gieringer amassed quite a collection of tiny, detailed buildings and accessories that became one of the worlds most famous and amazing miniature villages. Mr. Gieringer today is one of the world’s most respected builders of miniature models. In the 1930’s word of Mr. Gieringer’s amazing model railroad and miniature villages spread through the local neighborhoods. By 1935, the local newspaper learned of this local marvel and did a feature story about the amazing creation in Mr. Gieringer’s home.

Roadside_America_front

By 1941 it was time to move again in order to accommodate the increasing interest. Mr. Gieringer purchased land in the village of Shartlesville, PA in late 1940 and began to build a warehouse size building for his new and expanded miniature villages and train displays. In 1953, the new Roadside America opened again at its current site along what was then US Route 22 and today is Interstate 78 in Shartlesville, PA. The current display is beautifully maintained; exactly the way Mr. Gieringer left it when he passed away in 1963. It is operated today by his grand-daughter and her family.